This is the third part of an essay series surrounding the concept of identity. The reader is not required to read the series in any particular order, given that each essay (three in total) will include the necessary definitions regarding new concepts.

First part

Second part

Photo by Luca Lago on Unsplash

In the first part of this essay series, I addressed the issue with people who strongly identify with their nationality. This current essay, in some way, elaborates on this issue by including national pride and the traditions that complement a particular nation.

Shallow Defenders of Tradition

It should be patently clear that I am not advocating for a…


This is the second part of an essay-series surrounding the concept of identity. The reader is not required to read the series in any particular order, given that each essay (three in total) will include the necessary definitions regarding new concepts.

First part

Third part

Photo by Leo Foureaux on Unsplash

As time goes by, our collective identity has proven to be somewhat beneficial to us individuals. Ultimately, we have been made aware that belonging to a certain group — and possessing this sense of belonging — can have distinct advantages over going solo. Seeing that two pairs of eyes, ears, or hands are better than…


This is the first part of an essay-series surrounding the concept of identity. The reader is not required to read the series in any particular order, given that each essay (three in total) will include the necessary definitions regarding new concepts.

Second part

Third part

Photo by Tom Barrett on Unsplash

Emphasizing both distinctions and similarities between people has been a part of our daily discourses for a considerable amount of time. However, in the course of sifting through these differences that people identify with, we arguably lost track of their origin, as well as the reasons for justifying their current relevance. Meaning, we collectively elevated…


One of the main epistemological questions that various thinkers have tried to answer is ‘what does it mean to know?’. The German-American philosopher Nicholas Rescher is one of those (relatively recent) thinkers who criticized the long-established answer to that question in his 2003 book Epistemology: An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge.


I didn’t “fit” in society. That isn’t a problem of society. Setting aside moments of petulance, I viewed it as a plain fact. There it was. What to do about it? Ask society to adapt to me? Hah! — The suicide note of Will Moore (a high functioning autistic political science professor)

As I’ve mentioned in my first article An Antidote to Autism that people with a form of autism don’t find it very easy to fit in society and it wasn’t easier before 1938. …


Before you continue reading, this article is not about a real antidote to autism. We all know autism can’t be cured, this does not mean that it can’t become less noticeable or even benefit you in some cases. To be clear, I’m talking from the perspective of a person with autism and what factors lead to the decrease of external traits that are commonly associate with forms of autism. Because autism is a spectrum, these things may not apply for you.

I am a 23-year-old man living in The Netherlands. When I was very young (2–3 years old) my parents…

Alessandro van den Berg

A BA in general economics, studying psychology at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam. Previously written for Areo Magazine and Merion West

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